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Biological Control of Cape-Ivy and Other Weeds: Advancements, Opportunities, and Considerations

July 6, 2017
7:30 pm
San Francisco County Fair Building

Speakers: Patrick J. Moran, Ph.D. & Scott L. Portman, Ph.D. Cape-ivy (Delairea odorata Lemaire) was introduced from South Africa and has invaded riparian, forest, and scrub habitats all along the California coast, even extending into southern Oregon. Cape-ivy vines smother other vegetation and degrade habitat quality. Work is now being done to reduce cape-ivy with biocontrol. Biocontrol is used because other methods such as herbicides and hand pulling are not cost effective for large areas. Itl involves the introduction of host-specific herbivorous natural enemies from the weed’s native range. The ultimate objective of biocontrol is to reduce the ability of the weed to grow, reproduce, disperse, and compete with native plants. Patrick and Scott will discuss their latest scientific research and the introduction of insect(s) to control cape-ivy. Like any weed control method, biocontrol has advantages, disadvantages, and risks and these points will also be discussed during the lecture. Dr. Patrick Moran is a Research Entomologist with the USDA-ARS, Exotic and Invasive Weeds Research Unit in Albany California, and previously worked for USDA-ARS in Texas, with a total of 16 years of experience and over 50 publications. His research focuses on biological and integrated management of invasive terrestrial and aquatic weeds that threaten water resources. He has expertise in plant-insect interactions, determination of the life cycle, host range and impact of biological control agents of weeds, and methods to improve their field establishment and impact. Patrick is Lead Scientist on a 5-year research project at the USDA-ARS, and Lead Co-Director on the Delta Region Area Wide Aquatic Weed Project (DRAAWP), focused on integrated control of aquatic weeds in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. He holds a B.S. degree in Biology from Tufts University, and a Ph.D. in Entomology from Penn State University. Dr. Scott Portman: Scott is a Postdoctoral Researcher with the USDA-ARS, Exotic and Invasive Weeds Research Unit in Albany California. Previously, Scott had a postdoctoral appointment at Montana State University where his research involved using biologicals to control insect pests of wheat. He has expertise in classical biological control, plant-insect interactions, chemical ecology, and insect molecular genetics. He holds a B.S. degree in Biology from Southeast Missouri State University, a Master’s in Entomology from the University of Florida, and a Ph.D. in Biology from Penn State University.

San Francisco County Fair Building

1199 9th Avenue, San Francisco, CA
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